Be Younger Next Year

Younger Next Year is in its 2nd edition

Happy New Year! Life in HD is back in action with a useful episode designed to get your fitness goals on track!

This episode is all about slowing down the aging process. Can you turn back your biological clock? Chris Crowley, one of the co-authors of the book Younger Next Year, says absolutely you can.

If your new year resolution to lose weight has already hit a snag, try changing the goal of losing weight (a short-term goal) to one where you focus on getting fit and staying fit for the rest of your life.

Chris Crowley, who in his mid 80’s was preparing to take a trip to ski Black Diamond slopes when I spoke with him, says that by taking control of our physical fitness and nutrition, we can prevent 70% of the normal problems associated with aging including weakness, sore joints, and bad balance. By exercising 6 days a week, we can eliminate 50% of serious illness and injury, and become 10% smarter. He and his co-author, Henry S. Lodge, MD, access numerous studies and research data to provide the science of aging and what we can do to live strong, fit, sexy, and smart until we are 80 and beyond.

I spoke with Chris for this episode of Life in HD to go through some tips for getting our fitness on track.

For more information on Younger Next Year, visit here.

Music for today’s show is Ride Out by Audiobinger under Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial license.

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How Can You Improve Your Parenting?

Practical advice for gifting the love of reading

There are dozens of things that we can do to improve our parenting skills. One thing that we can do is to help our children develop a love of learning and creative, independent thought.

When I reflect on my own experience as a young father helping my kids learn to read, I realize now that I made many mistakes. A lot of those mistakes were made out of shear ignorance. I tried to teach my children by applying pressure to perform well. And I am not a teacher by trade. I didn’t understand the necessary activities and building blocks needed to aid in developing cognitive ability and language skills. I made reading time a tense chore rather than an enjoyable discovery. I wish I had this conversation with New York Times children’s books editor Maria Russo when my kids were young. Sage advice from our conversation includes “Leave the teaching to teachers. Your job as a parent is to help your children discover the joy of reading.”

In their new book, How to Raise a Reader, Pamela Paul (editor of the New York Times Book Review) and Maria Russo (children’s books editor of the New York Times Book Review) divides the subject up into 4 stages of childhood – from babies to teens – and offer practical tips, strategies that work, and inspirational advice on how to help your kids develop a love of reading. Maria Russo was kind enough to chat with me on Life in HD. I hope you enjoy our conversation.

More information on How to Raise a Reader can be found here.

Music bed in this episode is Happy Ending by Scott Holmes under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License.

Don’t let me be the only bad parent out there. Please share your reading horror stories with me here.

Childfree By Choice

Dr Amy Blackstone – photo by Jeff Kirlin

You’d think, in 2019, that the choice to not  have children would be acceptable in our society, but American culture can’t accept the reality of a woman who does not want to be a mother.  Motherhood is sacred and revered.  Not wanting children goes against everything we’ve been taught to think about the concept of family.  Women and girls are portrayed in media and pop culture as individuals driven to get married and have children.  Yet in reality, there are plenty of women who would rather not have the stresses of parenting or the loss of individual identity.  And the pushback against the stigma of not wanting to be a parent has given birth to the childfree movement in America.  

Our conversation today centers on the childfree movement and our guest is Dr Amy Blackstone, author of Childfree by Choice: The Movement Redefining Family & Creating a New Age of Independence.  Dr Blackstone is a professor in Sociology  and the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center at the University of Maine where she studies childlessness and the childfree choice.  And she is no stranger to a wide range of negative responses when she informs people she doesn’t have – nor does she want – kids.

Music in this episode is Pumpkin Spice by Audiobinger under Creative Commons License and Ride Out by Audiobinger under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License.